We All Use Social Proof for Easier Decision-Making

Now for the third of a series of blogs that discusses Robert B. Cialdini’s 1984 landmark work on persuasion: Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The first post (https://velocitypublicaffairs.com/2019/08/19/issues-matter-more-than-partisanship-when-it-comes-to-persuasion/) deals with the idea of reciprocity; i.e., if you give people something, they’ll be much more likely to give you something in return. The second explores the concept of consistency. For marketers, this is the idea that persuading people to make a small commitment improves the likelihood they’ll make a bigger one later on, largely because they feel compelled to act according to how they’ve previously indicated they will. Today, we’ll explore Cialdini’s concept of social proof. 

Issues Matter More than Partisanship When It Comes To Persuasion

Every year there are elections, we are bombarded with calls, letters, signs, ads, and other things to get us to vote for or against a candidate.  Campaigns spend time and money on these tactics in part because this is how it has always been done or because their opponents are already doing it.  Yet, when it comes to actually persuading someone to change a position or to take an action, focusing on the partisan differences is not as effective as you would think. 

Consistency: Aligning your values with your actions (and vice versa)

Here’s the second in a series of blogs that discuss Robert B. Cialdini’s 1984 landmark work on persuasion: Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. Put more directly, how do you get people to do what you want them to. The first post (link to earlier blog post #7) deals with the idea of reciprocity; i.e., if you give people something, they’ll be much more likely to give you something in return. Today, we’ll explore the concept of consistency.